Fighting Fish On Fly

Fighting Fish On Fly

Fighting Fish On Fly … The Correct Way With the Right Fly Fishing Equipment Fighting fish on fly can be quite tricky at times, especially with larger fish. Fighting fish species on fly can be tricky and quite difficult, especially for the inexperienced fly fishermen. This page will give you the do’s and don’ts of fighting fish on a fly rod, you can also look at some information and pictures of how to correctly land a fish on fly fishing tackle. These rules apply to all South African fish species, whether it is a Bonefish or Largemouth Bass, the principles do not change. Hooking and landing a fish on fly tackle is the second most difficult aspect of fly fishing, after learning how to cast, and listed below are guides and tips of the best ways to land fish on fly fishing equipment. How To Fight A Fish On Fly? First of all when setting the hook or striking, not a lot of force needs to be put into the rod in order to hook the fish, unlike saltwater fishing… A short and fairly gently but quick strike will set the hook. Once the fish has been hooked the tricky part comes into play. You have to always keep your line as tight as possible but the fish must be able to take line when it wants to. If this is not done the fish can shake the hook or your leader can break. The Fly rod tip must always be kept up high in order to control and fight the fish. Once the fish is close to the bank...
How To Handle Trout

How To Handle Trout

How To Handle Trout …& Safely Release Trout In South Africa So They Survive! People often ask questions about how to handle trout correctly, so they can release them with the goal in mind of their survival. Trout are well know for not doing very well after a fight on fly tackle. The larger Trout in South Africa are especially difficult to release… A lot of anglers who practice the art of Fly Fishing prefer to release their prized Trout, especially the larger species. However not many anglers know how to release these Trout properly, although they have an idea. This page will show you and tell you exactly how to handle and safely revive and release South African Trout. First of all it is important to fight the fish properly on fly tackle, read more here. Once the fight is over then the difficult part starts.   Landing The Trout When you are getting ready to land a Trout it is important to have a net if you are planning on releasing the fish. Guide the trout into the open net while it is in the water, rather than scooping it up or trying to net it, this minimises any damage to the fish and also minimises the chance of the leader snapping or the Trout shaking the fly. Handling The Trout Once the Trout is in the net, wet your hands thoroughly and try not to touch the fish. I, however, like to get a photo of the fish so I wet my hands and hold it gently underneath, supporting its wait but not squeezing it to hard,...
Fishing Dry Flies

Fishing Dry Flies

Fishing Dry Flies In The Evening What is better than fishing dry flies in the evening? Fish The Fly visit Millstream Farm a few times a year, and we have been treating to some amazing evenings, with significant hatches, and a great back drop. Sometimes it really does not matter what size fish you catch. If you are fly fishing with a great friend, who also happens to be a passionate fly fishing, and you have beautiful Rainbow Trout rising all over, with an amazing drawn-out sunset, what could be better? We found bits and pieces of some older footage of Jason and Gareth fly fishing at Millstream, in Dullstroom South Africa. In this video the guys fish in some beautiful light and manage to catch a few Rainbow Trout in a small pond on a variety of dry flies: Stimulator, Royal Wulff and Orange DDD. Please have a look at the video below that we managed to make up. We also have a variety of other fly fishing videos that you might find interesting, as well as fly fishing photographs. We really hope you enjoy this video, and stay tuned for many, many more! Please subscribe to our YouTube channel if you would like to see more, or stay informed. Follow Us On Social Media... Fish The Fly knows how everyone loves updates, photo's and videos, so keep updated with all the latest fly fishing news from South Africa below! Instagram Follow facebook Follow Google+ Follow Twitter Follow Youtube...
Nymphs And Nymphing

Nymphs And Nymphing

Nymphs & Fly Fishing Nymphing How To Fish With Nymphs Effectively Fly fishing with nymphs can be intimidating at times, but you’ve got your flies ready, so let’s discuss this fly fishing technique in more detail. What are the best ways to attach them for successful fly fishing? In this post we are going to focus on stillwater flyfishing, because here is where the most variation can be achieved for different days, different waters and different weather conditions (eg windy days). Nymphs on days with little or no wind: In this situation, it is probably best to fish without any strike indicator, unless your eyesight is not as good as it used to be… Watch for the slightest movement in the line tip. If you need to use an indicator the best choice is to attach a dry fly to the leader at a position allowing the nymph to sink to the desired depth. To estimate the length of leader to fish a nymph at a chosen depth multiply the depth by 1.5. Use between 1 and 3 nymphs (Depending upon the rules of the water being fished)… The heaviest nymph should be on the point with lighter flies being tied at interval between the point and dry fly indicator. Nymphs on Windy Days: On these days, especially if a cross wind is blowing, it will need a weighted fly to get down to any reasonable fishing depth. Most modern flies are weighted using brass or glass beads tied into the fly or by threading a bead onto the leader so that it slides down to the point fly....
Top 10 Best Trout Flies

Top 10 Best Trout Flies

Best Trout Flies To Use In South Africa The Top Ten (10) Best Trout Flies To Have In Your Fly Box Fish The Fly has identified the top best Trout flies a fly fisherman (Could and should) use in South African waters. This is solely our opinion, bet we do guarantee that if you use this assortment of dry flies, nymphs, streamers and wet flies, you will catch Trout! Whether they are Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout or Golden Trout, these flies will work for you! We have been fly fishing for Trout our entire lives, and if you can name the fly, we have either bought or tied it, and used it. So these, the top 10 best trout flies, come from a lot of research, a lot of testing and countless hours on the water. They might not be everyone’s top 10, but they work really well, and these are definitely “go to” flies on tough days of Trout fishing. These flies can be used on stillwaters, streams and rivers. So, listed below you will find the top best trout flies to use in South African waters, listed from number 10 to number 4, and then we have a special feature with a longer description of the top 3 flies for Trout! The Top 10 Trout Flies Bloodworm The Bloodworm is a popular nymph, and can be used to target many species of fish, and can be fished in many ways… Read More. Epoxy Buzzer The Epoxy Buzzer is a superb freshwater fly pattern and is very versatile in how you can fish it and what you can...
Largemouth Bass On Fly

Largemouth Bass On Fly

Largemouth Bass On Fly In South Africa How To Catch Largemouth Bass On Fly Using Fly Fishing Techniques Catching Largemouth Bass on fly in South Africa can be challenging, but extremely rewarding. The Largemouth Bass is a very well respected South African freshwater fish. This predator attacks almost anything that moves, if it looks real or natural enough… This page will hopefully give you some insight and tips on how to fool, hook and land the Largemouth Bass, just by using Fly Fishing methods in South Africa… Catching Largemouth Bass on fly can be tricky and very frustrating, but once you hook that first Bass on fly, the adrenaline will keep you going until you land the fish… Below are some tips and advice for Fly fishing for Bass – Largemouth Bass, in South Africa… Fly Fishing Tackle Needed For Targeting Largemouth Bass Generally, the idea for targeting Largemouth Bass on a fly rod and fly reel is to fish slightly heavier than you would for Rainbow Trout (For example). Normally in South Africa, to catch Rainbow Trout, you would use between a 4 weight and 6 weight fly rod paired with the appropriate fly fishing reel. In our opinion, fly fishing for Largemouth Bass is no different, it all comes down to personal preference, what size leader you are going to use, and how heavy the fly you are using is. Many well respected Bass anglers say that you should use a Fly rod between a 7 and 9 weight for Bass… This is understandable because you have to tackle up when targeting Largemouth Bass, but as mentioned,...
Yellowfish Season

Yellowfish Season

Yellowfish Season In South Africa Fly Fishing For Yellows In South African Waters When we talk about Yellowfish Season in South Africa we, as fly fishers, are normally talking about the Smallmouth Yellowfish (Labeobarbus aeneus) in particular, especially when speaking about river fly fishing. In truth all Yellowfish species in South Africa do have a “season”, if we can call it that. The Yellowfish season is the time of year where the water heats up, and the fish species start moving into shallower water and rapids in order to feed on the vast diversity of underwater and hatching insects. They move into these more shallow, warm waters not only to feed, but also in preparation for spawning, which normally takes place after the first heavy rains or sparsely, between October and February. The spawning season is a long and drawn out affair, and depends heavily on the amount of food available, good rains, and a good flow of water of shallow gravel bottoms in-between rocks. When Yellowfish spawn, please try and avoid those areas. Many fishing venues in South Africa will warn you about the areas where spawning occurs. It is best to stay clear of these spawning spots, and it is bad to fish for Yellows during the spawn. Yellowfish Season starts in Spring, when the water starts warming up. I like to refer to Spring as the 1st of September, but generally after the first extended hot spell, the Yellowfish Season commences. The Yellowfish hold in the deeper pools during the colder Winter months and as soon as the water temperature (In most Rivers, anyway), hits 13...
Catching Trout In Spring

Catching Trout In Spring

How To Catch Rainbow Trout In Spring Season In South Africa? Trout in Spring can be a bit challenging, and a lot of factors effect this. The fact that they could be in their spawning transition stage, rainfall levels and wind. So all the spawning has stopped, the trout have been feeding heavily and now the “conventional” stillwater fly fishing can resume once more. There is lots of activity during the Spring months and fishing can be difficult on some days. Fish Activity & General Habits During This Period? Early Morning Mornings during Spring are often difficult to fish as not many hatches happen early morning in the Summer months, especially on the Highveld. The Rainbows generally feed and rise close to the surface just before sunrise and, on sunny mornings, will go quiet for about 30 minutes after sunrise. They feed in the dark picking off all the food items that might of drowned during the night that they hadn’t “felt” (with their lateral line) during the night time period. Mid Morning – Afternoon September, the month of Spring, can be really tough fly fishing, but October, November and December can be some of the most testing and difficult months to catch stillwater Rainbow Trout, as instead of aggravating them you now need to move more to imitating what they are currently feeding on. Damsel fly and dragon fly larvae are now starting to appear in stillwater systems in the Highveld, and these insects often have large midday underwater hatches, that many fly fisherman cannot see in deeper dams, weirs and lakes. It is during this time when...
My First Fly Fishing Experience

My First Fly Fishing Experience

My First Fly Fishing Experience By Adrian Pearce Cold. All I could focus on was the cold. When they said you’re going to need gloves, I didn’t take them seriously. But with my fingers shaking uncontrollably, their words hit home quite strongly. There I stood, on the bank of Lake Crystabel, rod in hand, trying to remember all the advice my friends, and amazing fisherman, Gareth and Gavin had imparted. So I let out some line, held out my rod so I could see my fly, got my arm in position and away I went…and within 10 seconds I was caught in the brush behind me. This happened a considerable number of times after that. Cold. All I could focus on was the cold. It’s half past five in the morning, I’m freezing my…socks off and I’ve just spent half an hour learning how to untangle my Fritz Woolly Bugger and line from all sorts of things, my person included. All I’d caught, up to that point, was glorious weed. I’d had enough and I thought, one more attempt at casting and I’m walking back to the cottage, where I’m having a few, no matter the time, and I’m done with this Fly fishing nonsense! So…arm in position, once again, fly where I can see you, and off we go. Back, but not to back, pause…and thrust forward, keep the momentum going and then one last thrust forward and release the slack line and slowly lower your rod…and I actually got it sort of decent. Then the waiting game began. I had an intermediate line so it took quite...
Red Rock River

Red Rock River

Fly Fishing The Red Rock River In The USA September 8, 1992 Patty and I were up earlier (6.30 breakfast ) for the 1 1/2hrs ride to Red Rock a private stretch of spring creek water in which there are very large fish – saw photo’s last night of 2 8 lb fish being cradled by their captor. A brief word one of the other guests at Craig Fellins lodge: George McCullogh senior was a WW2 navy pilot operating from aircraft carriers and was shot down in the Pacific along with numerous other pilots. He was lucky and was rescued from the sea. The day after 22 pilots were beheaded by the Japanese. A really super old gentleman with a sharp wit. He and his wife Betty would like to visit RSA and have already done quite a lot of homework. The fishing at Red Rock proved very difficult. The stream (actually the upper reaches of the BEAVERHEAD before the river is dammed to become the Clark Dam) is exactly what I imagined a spring creek to be: heavily weeded, open patches of gravel over which fish lay in a couple of feet of water. Large fish in crystal clear water were holding in their feeding positions. The day was characterised by a lack of insects hatching which results in the need to fish nymphs in the normal upstream manner when this was possible. In cases when it was necessary to cast up and across it was critically important to maintain a tight line to the fly and this was achieved by retrieving line even to the extent that...

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