How To Catch Spawning Trout

How To Catch Spawning Trout

How To Catch Spawning Trout During Winter In South Africa Spawning Trout in Winter on South Africa’s stillwaters… There’s something magical about approaching the stillwater on a cold Winter morning armed with a fly rod and reel, with the mist coming slowly off the water and the sun peering out over the Highveld hills. The Winter period is my favourite time to target Rainbow Trout in the still waters of Mpumalanga. From my perspective, this is one of the most challenging times to target Rainbows, due to them being in full spawn and hard to tempt with a neatly presented dry fly or a dropping nymph. For this precise reason I change my fly fishing tactics during the colder months, during the spawn, I use my sinking line setup and use a more unconventional method. Due to the lack of feeding the Trout participate in during the spawning season, the best way to catch them is by provocation. This entails using a large, flashy and buggy wet fly and stripping it as fast as you can until one of the Trout attack it. A lot of the time the hens will be the first fish to “hit” the fly, but the prize for me in spawning season, is catching a large cock fish. This is because the male Rainbows will not eat while they are breeding. The Fish – Trout Stillwater Trout are fish that have been stocked in dams, weirs or manmade lakes. These fish cannot breed in stillwater systems as they need a flowing river or stream for breeding to take place. Because of this, many fly fisherman,...
Fighting Fish On Fly

Fighting Fish On Fly

Fighting Fish On Fly … The Correct Way With the Right Fly Fishing Equipment Fighting fish on fly can be quite tricky at times, especially with larger fish. Fighting fish species on fly can be tricky and quite difficult, especially for the inexperienced fly fishermen. This page will give you the do’s and don’ts of fighting fish on a fly rod, you can also look at some information and pictures of how to correctly land a fish on fly fishing tackle. These rules apply to all South African fish species, whether it is a Bonefish or Largemouth Bass, the principles do not change. Hooking and landing a fish on fly tackle is the second most difficult aspect of fly fishing, after learning how to cast, and listed below are guides and tips of the best ways to land fish on fly fishing equipment. How To Fight A Fish On Fly? First of all when setting the hook or striking, not a lot of force needs to be put into the rod in order to hook the fish, unlike saltwater fishing… A short and fairly gently but quick strike will set the hook. Once the fish has been hooked the tricky part comes into play. You have to always keep your line as tight as possible but the fish must be able to take line when it wants to. If this is not done the fish can shake the hook or your leader can break. The Fly rod tip must always be kept up high in order to control and fight the fish. Once the fish is close to the bank...
How To Handle Trout

How To Handle Trout

How To Handle Trout …& Safely Release Trout In South Africa So They Survive! People often ask questions about how to handle trout correctly, so they can release them with the goal in mind of their survival. Trout are well know for not doing very well after a fight on fly tackle. The larger Trout in South Africa are especially difficult to release… A lot of anglers who practice the art of Fly Fishing prefer to release their prized Trout, especially the larger species. However not many anglers know how to release these Trout properly, although they have an idea. This page will show you and tell you exactly how to handle and safely revive and release South African Trout. First of all it is important to fight the fish properly on fly tackle, read more here. Once the fight is over then the difficult part starts.   Landing The Trout When you are getting ready to land a Trout it is important to have a net if you are planning on releasing the fish. Guide the trout into the open net while it is in the water, rather than scooping it up or trying to net it, this minimises any damage to the fish and also minimises the chance of the leader snapping or the Trout shaking the fly. Handling The Trout Once the Trout is in the net, wet your hands thoroughly and try not to touch the fish. I, however, like to get a photo of the fish so I wet my hands and hold it gently underneath, supporting its wait but not squeezing it to hard,...
Saltwater Fly Fishing 101

Saltwater Fly Fishing 101

    Saltwater Fly Fishing In South Africa Where, What, How, Why… Saltwater Fly fishing 101 Saltwater Fly Fishing is a challenging form of angling, and definitely tests a fly fisherman’s patience and skills to the maximum. Fly Fishing is often imagined with a stream, accompanied by schools of colourful trout feeding in shallow water; but very rarely imagined with an angler on some prawn banks, casting a fly at Grunter frolicking in the mud. This article will talk about the latter of the two scenarios, and why it is so rewarding.     When anglers talk about saltwater fishing in South Africa, very few conversations will be about fly fishing, rather spinning, rock and surf, dropshot and offshore. Once an angler lands that first fish on fly, he will be hooked! Fly Fishing in estuaries or in the surf is often overlooked as angler’s prefer to fish areas with other artlure or bait methods. I think this is as a result of the unwillingness of the angler to ‘waste his time throwing an artificial fly back and forth’. This can be a huge misconception, because if you get the fly right, the tide right, the time right where you are lucky enough to find a shoal of fish, you can be in for the time of your life. Targeting Saltwater Fish Species – South African Saltwater Fly Fishing The beauty for me when saltwater fly fishing, is that you can literally catch every species of fish South African surf and estuaries boast, from 2cm Glassies to 90cm Garrick. All depending on what size fly you use, what area...
Slow Day Trout Fishing

Slow Day Trout Fishing

Slow Day Trout Fishing? Not Anymore! Catch More Trout On Fly On Slow Days In South Africa Slow day trout fishing? We have some tips to assist you in catching more fish on fly in South Africa… Often in the build up to the Winter months, Trout can be tougher to catch than normal. This applies to stillwater and river Trout; Rainbow, Brown or Golden. Due to the water temperatures warming up in South Africa these fish become lethargic and it can be a nightmare to mimic what they are feeding on during a hatch. Don’t get me wrong, dry fly and Nymphing techniques will work, but if you want quantities of fish and larger fish in the hotter months there is a technique you should try when the Trout are not playing the game. I like to call this method of fly fishing, the Fast Strip Technique… Trout are predatory fish and will often feed or attack on something that is annoying them, this could be dragon flies or tilapia. The key here is the word “annoying”. How many times have you casted the perfect fly, in the perfect spot and used the perfect technique and nothing happens? Plenty I am sure, this is where the “fast strip” will make a huge difference to your catch rate and the size of the fish you catch.     The fast strip is very simple and easy to understand and catches a lot of fish. To be successful you will need the following: 4/5 weight fly rod Fast sinking line Woolly Buggers, Zonkers and Fritz’s How? Cast your fly line...
Nymphs And Nymphing

Nymphs And Nymphing

Nymphs & Fly Fishing Nymphing How To Fish With Nymphs Effectively Fly fishing with nymphs can be intimidating at times, but you’ve got your flies ready, so let’s discuss this fly fishing technique in more detail. What are the best ways to attach them for successful fly fishing? In this post we are going to focus on stillwater flyfishing, because here is where the most variation can be achieved for different days, different waters and different weather conditions (eg windy days). Nymphs on days with little or no wind: In this situation, it is probably best to fish without any strike indicator, unless your eyesight is not as good as it used to be… Watch for the slightest movement in the line tip. If you need to use an indicator the best choice is to attach a dry fly to the leader at a position allowing the nymph to sink to the desired depth. To estimate the length of leader to fish a nymph at a chosen depth multiply the depth by 1.5. Use between 1 and 3 nymphs (Depending upon the rules of the water being fished)… The heaviest nymph should be on the point with lighter flies being tied at interval between the point and dry fly indicator. Nymphs on Windy Days: On these days, especially if a cross wind is blowing, it will need a weighted fly to get down to any reasonable fishing depth. Most modern flies are weighted using brass or glass beads tied into the fly or by threading a bead onto the leader so that it slides down to the point fly....
Catching Trout In Spring

Catching Trout In Spring

How To Catch Rainbow Trout In Spring Season In South Africa? Trout in Spring can be a bit challenging, and a lot of factors effect this. The fact that they could be in their spawning transition stage, rainfall levels and wind. So all the spawning has stopped, the trout have been feeding heavily and now the “conventional” stillwater fly fishing can resume once more. There is lots of activity during the Spring months and fishing can be difficult on some days. Fish Activity & General Habits During This Period? Early Morning Mornings during Spring are often difficult to fish as not many hatches happen early morning in the Summer months, especially on the Highveld. The Rainbows generally feed and rise close to the surface just before sunrise and, on sunny mornings, will go quiet for about 30 minutes after sunrise. They feed in the dark picking off all the food items that might of drowned during the night that they hadn’t “felt” (with their lateral line) during the night time period. Mid Morning – Afternoon September, the month of Spring, can be really tough fly fishing, but October, November and December can be some of the most testing and difficult months to catch stillwater Rainbow Trout, as instead of aggravating them you now need to move more to imitating what they are currently feeding on. Damsel fly and dragon fly larvae are now starting to appear in stillwater systems in the Highveld, and these insects often have large midday underwater hatches, that many fly fisherman cannot see in deeper dams, weirs and lakes. It is during this time when...

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